Tag: Mass General Research Institute

Awards and Honors: June 2018

Massachusetts General Hospital’s talented and dedicated researchers are working to push the boundaries of science and medicine every day. In this series we highlight a few individuals who have recently received awards or honors for their achievements: Ouri Cohen, a postdoctoral fellow in the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, has been honored with the 2017 ...

Learning Not to Fear: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Improves Fear Extinction

Gunes Sevinc, PhD, is a postdoctoral research fellow in the lab of Sara Lazar, PhD, in the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital. Her poster recently won an award at Mass General’s Research Fellow Poster Celebration. Continue reading to hear Dr. Sevinc explain her research: Being able to regulate one’s emotions is a critical ...

New Tool for Predicting C. Difficile Infections Shows Promising Results

For patients in hospital and healthcare settings, a Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection is a complication that can result in serious complications and even death. C. difficile is caused by a bacterium and the symptoms of infection include diarrhea, fever and severe abdominal cramps. While some cases may be mild, some can be fatal—particularly in elderly, very ...

Looking for Insights to A Rare Genetic Neurologic Disease

Amanda Furness, PhD, is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Center for Genomic Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. Her poster, Therapeutic insight into Mucolipidosis IV via in vitro glia models, recently won an award at Mass General’s Research Fellow Poster Celebration. We asked Dr. Furness about her research: What problem(s) are you addressing with this ...

A Snapshot of Science

What’s new in research at Mass General? Here’s a snapshot of studies recently published in top-tier scientific journals: NEW INSIGHTS INTO HOW GENETICS INFLUENCE MIGRAINES Common Variant Burden Contributes to the Familial Aggregation of Migraine in 1,589 Families Gormley P, Kurki MI, Hiekkala ME, Veerapen K, Häppölä P [et al.], Palotie A Published in Neuron on May ...

Celebrating Mass General’s Remarkable Research Staff

Both sides of the Bulfinch Tents at Massachusetts General Hospital were bustling May 24 at the annual Research Staff Appreciation Day event. More than 2,000 research staff members – including lab technicians, research coordinators and technologists – were invited to enjoy a picnic-style lunch, ice cream and raffles for tickets to the Museum of Science. Bowls ...

New Imaging Protocol Could Vastly Accelerate Clinical Trials for New ALS Treatments

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a new technique for imaging the brains of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) that could vastly reduce the cost and time needed for new clinical trials—while also improving the accuracy of test results. Nazem Atassi, MD, the Associate Director of the Neurological Clinical Research Institute (NCRI) at ...

New National Research Program Focuses on Connection and Community

Why do some individuals and populations experience poorer health outcomes than others? When it comes to health disparities in the United States, many would say the problem is a vicious cycle. Research shows that diseases like heart disease and cancer disproportionately affect racial and ethnic minority populations. Yet biomedical research studies and clinical trials have ...

Research Awards and Honors: May 2018

Massachusetts General Hospital’s talented and dedicated researchers are working to push the boundaries of science and medicine every day. In this series we highlight a few individuals who have recently received awards or honors for their achievements: M. Amin Arnaout, MD, chief emeritus of the Division of Nephrology and director of the Leukocyte Biology and ...

How New Biomarkers and Smartphone Apps Could Provide New Hope for ALS Patients

When a patient has strep throat, their care provider knows which antibiotics to prescribe to cure the ailment. But when a disease has no known cure, as is the case with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), research often becomes part of clinical care. “There are still a lot of limitations in terms of what we can ...