Tag: mass general cancer center

Five Things to Know About Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Harvest

Jonathan Hoggatt, PhD, an investigator with the Mass General Cancer Center and the Center for Transplantation Sciences at Massachusetts General Hospital, was part of a research team that recently published a study in Cell describing an innovative new method for harvesting bone marrow stem cells for transplant. The process could be game changing for both the ...

Research Awards and Honors: February 2018

Massachusetts General Hospital’s talented and dedicated researchers are working to push the boundaries of science and medicine every day. In this series we highlight a few individuals who have recently received awards or honors for their achievements: Dania Daye, MD, PhD, a resident in the Department of Radiology, has received a Trainee Research Prize from ...

12 Days of Research at Mass General: Aspirin and Risk of Cancer Death

In the 12 days leading up to our holiday hiatus, we are looking back on the past year and sharing some highlights in Massachusetts General Hospital research news from each month of 2017. April 2017: New Study Finds Low-Dose Aspirin May Lower Risk of Cancer Death A new study from Massachusetts General Hospital reports that long-term regular ...

Researchers Use Machine Learning to Improve Breast Cancer Screening Techniques

Imagine enduring a painful, expensive and scar-inducing surgery—only to find out afterwards that it wasn’t necessary. This is the situation for many women with high-risk breast lesions—areas of tissue that appear suspicious on a mammogram and have abnormal but not cancerous cells when tested by needle biopsy. Following surgical removal, 90% of these lesions end ...

Liquid Biopsies Give Clues on When and Why Cancer Treatments Lose their Efficacy

With the advent of targeted cancer therapies and immunotherapy, and with new CAR-T therapies on the way, more cancer patients are living with their disease. However, many cancer patients find that their therapies have limitations and are faced with the potential of disease progression. Often, those who initially respond to a course of treatment eventually ...

Meet a Mass General Postdoc: Echoe Bouta

In honor of National Postdoc Appreciation Week, all this week we’ll be sharing profiles of just a few of our amazing Mass General postdocs to highlight their research and what inspires them. Meet Echoe Bouta, PhD, a research fellow in the Department of Radiation Oncology. Where did you get your PhD from? University of Rochester ...

New Study Shows Lymph Nodes Aren’t Always to Blame for Cancer’s Progression

In a case of mistaken identity, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have found that lymph nodes are not always responsible for cancer’s deadly spread to other organs. These results buck many preconceived notions about lymph nodes’ role in cancer development and suggest a new pattern for the progression of certain types of cancer. Doctors recognize ...

Women’s Health Week 2017

In honor of National Women’s Health Week this week, we put together a few highlights of the many Massachusetts General Hospital researchers who are investigating important topics pertaining to women’s health: Eve Valera, PhD, a researcher at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, is working to learn more about the traumatic brain injuries suffered by ...

Specialized Screening Protocol May Improve Detection of Ovarian Cancer in High-Risk Women

First, let’s define a few key words: CA125: A protein found on the surface of many ovarian cancer cells. Most women with ovarian cancer have CA125 levels in the blood that are over 35. ROCA: An abbreviation for Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm, a test that assesses risk for developing ovarian cancer. This test tracks ...

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Mass. General Study Identifies Genomic Differences Between Breast Cancers of African American and White Women

“In addition to having a higher prevalence of triple-negative breast cancers than Caucasian women – something that has been documented in previous studies – we found that African American women with breast cancer had a significantly higher prevalence of the TP53 driver mutation, basal tumor subtype and greater genomic diversity within tumors, all of which suggest more aggressive tumor ...