Tag: aging

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Weekend Links — Our Favorite Science Stories from the Web This Week

We’ve hand-picked a mix of research-related news and science stories for your weekend reading enjoyment.

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ResearchResolution-Salinas

Research Your Resolution: Boost Your Brain Health With Social Connections

Joel Salinas, MD, is a behavioral neurologist, neuropsychiatrist, and social epidemiologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Brain Health. To learn more about his research, please visit his lab website. When we make social connections with other people, we live better and have healthier brains for longer. This might mean re-connecting with old friends, […]

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Jennifer Gatchel studying Alzheimer's disease

12 Days of Research at Mass General: Untangling the Connections Between Alzheimer’s Disease and Mental Illness

In the 12 days leading up to our holiday hiatus, we are looking back on the past year and sharing some highlights in Massachusetts General Hospital research news from each month of 2017. But before we get to the research, we want to thank you for following along with the Research Institute in 2017! We’ll […]

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Jennifer Gatchel studying Alzheimer's disease

Gatchel Untangles the Causes of Mood and Anxiety Symptoms and Loss of Brain Function in Aging Populations

Mass General geriatric psychiatrist Jennifer Gatchel MD, PhD, is working to unravel the connections between mental illness and the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Weekend Links

We’ve hand-picked a mix of Massachusetts General Hospital and other research-related news and stories for your weekend reading enjoyment: A New Study Finds Good News About Treating Addiction – Dr. John Kelly of the Recovery Research Institute at Massachusetts General Hospital talks about his new study and says there’s some good news when it comes to […]

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Study Strengthens Evidence That Mental Activity Reduces Dementia Risk

Do you enjoy mind-stimulating activities such as reading, playing brain games or attending cultural events? The evidence is growing that they can boost your brain functioning and delay the development of Alzheimer’s disease or other age-associated dementias. While previous research studies have suggested this link, questions remained as to whether there was a real cause-and-effect relationship, or if […]

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