Month: February 2018

Could Controlling Inflammation Improve Cystic Fibrosis Therapies?

Today, February 28th, is the 11th annual International Rare Disease Day. This is a day for every member of the rare disease community—patients, caregivers, and researchers—to join together on behalf of all of those suffering with a rare disease. In this blog post we highlight one Massachusetts General Hospital researcher who is tackling rare disease. Fifty ...

Research Awards and Honors: February 2018

Massachusetts General Hospital’s talented and dedicated researchers are working to push the boundaries of science and medicine every day. In this series we highlight a few individuals who have recently received awards or honors for their achievements: Dania Daye, MD, PhD, a resident in the Department of Radiology, has received a Trainee Research Prize from ...

bouquet of flowers

Weekend Links

We’ve hand-picked a mix of Massachusetts General Hospital and other research-related news and stories for your weekend reading enjoyment: How to wake up in a good mood every day – The Society of American Florists, in conjunction with Nancy Etcoff, an investigator at Mass General, conducted a six-month study into how keeping flowers in the ...

What’s Next for Cardiac Research and Clinical Care?

The American Heart Association hosted its annual Scientific Sessions in November. This week-long event provided an opportunity for clinicians, basic scientists, and researchers to discuss what’s new and what’s next for cardiac research and clinical care. Here’s what Massachusetts General Hospital researchers and cardiologists found most interesting from this year’s sessions: New guidelines for high ...

Remembering the Legacy of a Mass General Neurophysiologist and Pioneer in Race Relations at Harvard

Black History Month is an annual celebration in February of achievements by African Americans. This year, we’re commemorating the life and legacy of S. Allen Counter, a Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School, a neurophysiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and the founding director of the Harvard Foundation for Intercultural and Race Relations. Although Counter ...

Mass General Research Institute goes red for heart month

Using Zebrafish Models to Study Cardiovascular Disease

Maryline Abrial, PhD, is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Burns Lab at the Cardiovascular Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital. She took part in a science communication internship at the Mass General Research Institute this fall. She wrote this first-person account of her life as a researcher as part of her internship. Background and ...

Weekend Links

We’ve hand-picked a mix of Massachusetts General Hospital and other research-related news and stories for your holiday weekend reading enjoyment: When love and science double date – coverage of research by Mass General psychiatrists Richard Schwartz and Jacqueline Olds, mentions study led by Mass General investigator Robert Waldinger Caring for Ms. L. — Overcoming My Fear ...

Could Strenuous Exercise Be Bad for Your Heart?

If you’ve noticed a trend in runners signing up for half-, full-, or even ultra-marathons, it isn’t just your subconscious guilting you into exercising — the number of recreational endurance exercise participants has in fact increased in recent years, and RunningUSA predicts the number of participants will continue to rise. Research has already confirmed that ...

Could Part of Our Genome Predict Future Risk for Heart Disease?

Research from Saumya Das, MD, PhD, co-director of the Resynchronization and Advanced Cardiac Therapeutics Program at Massachusetts General Hospital, focuses on studying irregular heartbeats (known as arrhythmias) in patients with heart failure, discovering new tests to better identify who is at risk for developing heart failure or arrhythmias, and uncovering new therapies to treat heart ...

Nandita Scott, MD and Malissa Wood, MD, co-directors of  the Corrigan Women’s Heart Health Program

Women’s Heart Health Program Leaders Look Ahead

Cardiovascular disease — including heart attacks, stroke and heart failure — is the number one killer of adults, but more women die of it than men. The Elizabeth Anne and Karen Barlow Corrigan Women’s Heart Health Program was launched in 2007 to focus awareness, treatments and research on the unique issues women face in maintaining heart ...