Month: October 2016

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Reading the Unconscious Mind Under General Anesthesia

In September, eight researchers came to Massachusetts General Hospital to compete in our first-ever Art of Talking Science competition during HUBweek. Each researcher had four minutes to present their science to an audience of 200 people and a panel of judges, and then received feedback on how well they communicated the impact and significance of their work. Participants included scientists ...

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Research at Massachusetts General Hospital

Did you know that Massachusetts General Hospital is home to the largest hospital-based research program in the United States? We’re a community of over 8,000 people working to improve the lives of our patients and those across the globe. http://bit.ly/2e4kHsP

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New Method for Testing Blood Sugar Levels Could Improve Diabetes Monitoring

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a new method for measuring blood sugar levels in diabetes patients that could reduce testing errors by 50 percent. The new method, which uses a mathematical formula that factors in the average age of a person’s red blood cells (RBCs) in addition to the cells’ overall blood sugar ...

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New Mass General Studies May Unlock Mysteries of Asthma

What makes an asthma attack different from an allergic reaction? Thanks to some groundbreaking technology, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital may have uncovered new clues. They recently used an innovative new imaging tool, in combination with a new technique for investigating the allergic immune response, to determine why some individuals with allergies to airborne allergens ...

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Mass General Scientists are Growing New Hearts in the Cells of Old Ones

(From an article in Atlas Obscura by Sarah Laskow) For decades now, there’s been an image of human regeneration being a few cells dividing in a petri dish, hopefully growing into a shiny new organ. But the truth is that scientists’ work is a bit more macabre. To make a new organ, it helps to be working from a ...

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Study Strengthens Evidence That Mental Activity Reduces Dementia Risk

Do you enjoy mind-stimulating activities such as reading, playing brain games or attending cultural events? The evidence is growing that they can boost your brain functioning and delay the development of Alzheimer’s disease or other age-associated dementias. While previous research studies have suggested this link, questions remained as to whether there was a real cause-and-effect relationship, or if ...