Month: June 2016

C

Can You Accidentally Overdose On Imodium?

Massachusetts General Hospital gastroenterologist Dr. Kyle Staller discusses the possibility of overdosing on Imodium, a popular OTC anti-diarrheal pill. LEARN MORE

M

Museum and Ether Dome Offer Insights Into the Hospital’s History

(Editor’s note: This summer, the Mass General Research Institute has two communications interns working with us as we work to highlight all of the research that takes place across Massachusetts General Hospital. Here is a post from our intern Milo Goodman.) One major highlight of my first week as a Communications Intern was visiting the ...

‘Hygiene Hypothesis’ Gets a Gut Check

A multi-institutional team that includes researchers from Mass General is investigating the so-called “hygiene hypothesis,” which suggests that early exposure to bacteria and other microbes early in life may help train the immune system to function properly and reduce the likelihood of developing autoimmune diseases and allergies, which have become more prevalent in modernized countries. A recent study of the ...

T

TRACK ALS Succeeds in Measuring Brain Inflammation Using a PET Scan and Biomarker – ALS News Today

One big challenge in developing treatments for ALS is that there is no reliable way to track the progression of the disease in the brain and gauge the effectiveness of new treatments. However, researchers at Mass General were recently able to use a radiotracer to track neural inflammation—a key indicator of the disease—in ALS patients. This technique could help ...

M

Meet Our Summer Communications Interns!

This summer the Mass General Research Institute is fortunate to welcome two undergraduate students to our new summer internship program. Milo Goodman and Alyssa Gocinski will be visiting labs and centers around the Mass General campus to write stories and blog posts about some of the amazing research that takes place here every day. Be ...

I

Implantable Device Targets Pancreatic Cancer

A research team from Mass General and MIT has designed a tiny, adjustable implant that could be used to deliver chemotherapy drugs directly into pancreatic cancers, instead of requiring the drugs to travel through the entire circulatory system to reach the pancreas. In laboratory models, delivering treatment directly to the source proved to be 12 times more effective than intravenous ...