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Weekend Links

We’ve hand-picked a mix of Massachusetts General Hospital and other research-related news and stories for your weekend reading enjoyment: Cancer Researcher Teamed Up With Superheroes – A new cancer awareness campaign by American Airlines features Mass General’s Marcela Maus, MD, PhD, along with other researchers and airlines staff who either have fought cancer or are still doing ...

Online Platform Accelerates Rare Disease Research

Earlier this week, the Mass General Neurological Clinical Research Center (NCRI)’s  NeuroBANK™ won Bio-IT World‘s Best Practice award in the Personalized & Translational Medicine category. What is the NeuroBANK, and how is it helping to accelerate the discovery, development, and delivery of future treatments for rare diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? Filling a Need ...

Paganoni Advances ALS Research and Care with Technology

Technological advancements have revolutionized nearly every field of medicine from orthopedics to genetic testing. Sabrina Paganoni, MD, PhD, a clinician and researcher in the Neurological Clinical Research Institute (NCRI) at Massachusetts General Hospital, has seen firsthand the potential power and impact technology could have for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Paganoni is using technology to find ...

Research Finds Daily Exercise Can Make for Healthier, Younger Hearts

We know that exercise is good for heart health. But how? Now new research from a team based at Massachusetts General Hospital, the Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology (HSCRB), Harvard Medical School (HMS), and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) has released preliminary findings showing that exercise can increase the generation of ...

Weekend Links

We’ve hand-picked a mix of Massachusetts General Hospital and other research-related news and stories for your weekend reading enjoyment: A Professor of ‘Cute Studies’ Explains Why We Love Babies in Glasses – Why do adults go so nuts over babies wearing glasses? Hear from Tokyo Gakugei University professor Joshua Paul Dale, co-editor of the book The Aesthetics and Affects ...

Mass General Investigators on the Cutting Edge of ALS Research

May is ALS Awareness Month, intended as a time to raise awareness of and foster research for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Eventually these motor neurons die, effecting a patient’s ability to move, eat, ...

Racing to Stop a ‘Silent’ Killer

May 8th is World Ovarian Cancer Day, a day to raise awareness about the disease. Ovarian cancer has the lowest survival rate of all female cancers. Learn what one Massachusetts General Hospital researcher is doing to improve diagnosis in the hopes of saving patients’ lives. Despite advances in the early identification of some cancers, the ability ...

Weekend Links

We’ve hand-picked a mix of Massachusetts General Hospital and other research-related news and stories for your weekend reading enjoyment: Want to build a dragon? Science is here for you – If someone were to create a dragon, how would it get its flame? Nature, it seems, has all the parts a dragon needs to set the world ...

Mapping the Connections Between Allergies and the Microbiome

Why do some children develop severe allergies or autoimmune disorders when their parents have no history of either condition? Rather than looking to genetics for clues, the answer may lie in the communication that occurs between the T cells of the immune system and the bacteria in the gut, particularly at a very young age. ...

Study Looks at Risk Factors for Overdose in Adolescents

A team of investigators from the Addiction Recovery Management Service at Massachusetts General Hospital have identified factors that may increase the risk of drug overdose in adolescents and young adults. The results of their study were published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry last month. Here are five things to know: Substance use patterns are ...